Cholesterol and
Heart Disease

Salt, High Blood Pressure
and Hypertension

Sugar, High Blood Pressure
and Hypertension

Trans Fatty Acids and
Heart Disease

High Triglycerides =
High Cholesterol

Heart Disease,
Good Fats and Harmful Fats

Free Radicals and
Heart Disease

Food Cautions for
Heart Disease

Fiber Ė A Key to Lowering
Cholesterol

Eat more, eat less
Diet, Digestion and
Hypertension

Alkaline Diet to Prevent
Heart Disease and
Osteoporosis


Heart Disease, Good Fats and Harmful Fats

meditation for health

You will hear a lot about avoiding fats and you will see how fats can constrict blood vessels beyond the obvious cholesterol connection. Just as in every never-ending story, there are good guys and bad guys, there are good fats and bad fats. The key is which ones you are eating. Different fats react differently in your body and this affects blood pressure. The difference concerns the production of prostaglandins, because there are good and bad types of prostaglandins that affect blood pressure. Letís examine the difference.

The colon manufactures short-chain fatty acids from fiber. Shortchain fatty acids lower cholesterol and protect you against colon cancer. Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, macadamia nut oil and avocado lower the low-density lipids (LDL) and do not affect the good cholesterol (HDL). Olive oil, which has been used for centuries, is high in these monounsaturated fatty acids, and should be used liberally. Buy this oil in a dark green bottle and store it in a cool dark place. A study using extra virgin olive oil significantly lowered blood pressure in patients with moderate (less than 165/104) hypertension. If you cook in a wok, sprinkle water on the food to keep the temperature lower to prevent the fat in the oil from oxidizing. In addition to olive oil, research has demonstrated that the oil of oregano, cumin, and pumpkin seed, can lower blood pressure and improve insulin resistance.

You will hear a lot about avoiding fats and you will see how fats can constrict blood vessels beyond the obvious cholesterol connection. Just as in every never-ending story, there are good guys and bad guys, there are good fats and bad fats. The key is which ones you are eating. Different fats react differently in your body and this affects blood pressure. The difference concerns the production of prostaglandins, because there are good and bad types of prostaglandins that affect blood pressure. Letís examine the difference.

Twenty-three patients on anti-hypertensive medication were assigned to a diet containing either extra-virgin olive oil or sunflower oil. After six months the groups crossed over to the other diet for another six months. Drug usage was cut by 48% in the olive oil group, which yielded a greater reduction in blood pressure than the sunflower oil group.389 Olive oil rich in polyphenols enhances internal nitric oxide production, which expands blood vessels. As an antioxidant, olive oil protects LDL from oxidation, helps prevent plaque buildup, and helps stop blood platelets from sticking together.

Because cooking involves heating the oil beneficial properties can be lost. Some are more delicate than others. Olive oil is more stable than most oils. You can also use olive oil as a salad dressing, or pour some on luke-warm foods such as rice or steamed vegetables. Macadamia nut oil is even more stable and is 80% monounsaturated Ė the highest among popular cooking oils. Coconut oil, a saturated stable fat, lowers blood levels of lipoprotein(a), elevates HDL, and more. Modern research has shown that not all saturated fats are alike. According to Jon J. Kabara, Ph.D, Professor Emeritus, Michigan State University, the fatty acids in coconut oil, the medium chain triglycerides, do not raise serum cholesterol or contribute to heart disease like the long chain triglycerides found in seed oils. Butter and ghee are also stable saturated fats, and are healthy because they do not oxidize like polyunsaturated oils such as corn or soy. Raw nut butters such as almond butter contain healthy fat, which lowers cholesterol. Most of your cholesterol is made in the liver; it is not from your diet.

We discussed the danger of high heat cooking, which also produces glycotoxins (think of glycation), in your body. High heat cooking causes sugars and certain oxidized fats to react with proteins to form glycotoxins in the food. Glycotoxins may be responsible for the induction of a lowgrade, but chronic state of inflammation. Consider steaming, simmering, stewing and using a slow cooker to limit the production of glycotoxins. It is also advisable to use glass cookware because heating releases unhealthy gasses from non-stick cookware such as Teflon.390 Please see the website: http://www.ewg.org/reports/toxicteflon/es.php.

Now back to fat. Americans have substituted unhealthy fats like margarine (canola or cottonseed oils) for healthy fats like butter, extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil. Heart disease was low at the turn of the 20th century; it rose precipitously between 1920 and 1960. Butter is rich in vitamin A, needed by the thyroid and adrenal glands, and both of these are important for healthy cardiovascular functioning. The lecithin in butter assists in the proper assimilation and metabolism of cholesterol and other fat constituents. It also contains vitamin E and selenium, both of which are important antioxidants. A survey showed that butter consumption verses margarine cuts the risk of developing heart disease in half.391 If you wish to use healthy vegetable oils, call Omega Nutrition at 1-800-661-3529 and get a copy of the catalog. The only oil Omega sells that is not recommended, is canola oil. Pay special attention to the temperature chart. Do not use any of the oils above the temperature listed on the chart.

Polyunsaturated fats lower the bad kind of cholesterol. The problem is that polyunsaturated fats lower the good kind of cholesterol as well. Examples are corn oil and liquid margarine.

Understanding these different types of fats helps you control blood pressure, because different types of fats influence prostaglandins.



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